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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Image of the Day: Glowing Gloves

Image of the Day: Glowing Gloves

By | March 2, 2017

These gloves, which contain genetically engineered bacteria that light up when in contact with certain chemicals, could aid crime scene investigators.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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