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image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

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Speciation and development of new traits may not always go hand-in-hand.

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image: Science Teaching Standards up for Revision in Texas

Science Teaching Standards up for Revision in Texas

By | February 9, 2017

Despite a committee of educators recommending the removal of language challenging evolution in science curricula, state education board members vote to reintroduce controversial concepts. 

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image: How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

By | February 7, 2017

Pitcher plants across different continents acquired their tastes for meat in similar ways.

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image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

By | January 17, 2017

Infected with Wolbachia, the insects are expected to reduce the spread of dengue and Zika. But scientists say the approach may have limitations.

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