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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

Image of the Day: Tissue Feast

By | December 5, 2017

Researchers are taking a close look at the bacterium that causes listeriosis disease.  

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image: Report: Security Lapses in Handling of Deadly Pathogens

Report: Security Lapses in Handling of Deadly Pathogens

By | October 31, 2017

A government report finds that laboratories in the U.S. that work with select agents such as Ebola and anthrax aren’t as secure as they should be.

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image: Image of the Day: Microbes on Fake Mars

Image of the Day: Microbes on Fake Mars

By | October 18, 2017

By simulating the structure and composition of Mars’s rocky materials, scientists observe how the metal-eating, extreme environment–inhabiting microbe Metallosphaera sedula could alter extraterrestrial environments.

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Image of the Day: Rainbow Gut

Image of the Day: Rainbow Gut

By | October 11, 2017

Rather than organizing into easily defined compartments, different microbes mix and intermingle within the mouse gut, scientists find.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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Mice receiving the treatment produced their own monoclonal antibodies and survived infection with the life-threatening pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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image: Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

By | September 13, 2017

Bacterial strains in mice’s gut microbiomes mediated their pups’ risk for developing abnormal behaviors.

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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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