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image: Zebrafish Embryos Survive Deep Freeze and Quick Thaw

Zebrafish Embryos Survive Deep Freeze and Quick Thaw

By Ashley Yeager | July 28, 2017

In a first, scientists reanimate the fish using embedded gold nanoparticles that heat up cells by absorbing laser light.

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image: Image of the Day: Reunited and It Feels So Good

Image of the Day: Reunited and It Feels So Good

By The Scientist Staff | July 28, 2017

Zebrafish have a remarkable ability to heal their damaged nerve fibers following a spinal injury.

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image: Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

Scientists Edit Viable Human Embryos in U.S.

By Kerry Grens | July 27, 2017

The embryos, whose genes were altered by CRISPR, were not intended for implantation. 

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Two freely available databases include data on hundreds of human cancer cell lines. 

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image: Image of the Day: Embryonic Ripples

Image of the Day: Embryonic Ripples

By The Scientist Staff | July 26, 2017

This fluttering clump of colorful cells is a zebrafish embryo, visualized by many stacked images.

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image: Dogs with Duchenne Treated with Gene Therapy

Dogs with Duchenne Treated with Gene Therapy

By Diana Kwon | July 25, 2017

Researchers restored muscle function in animals with muscular dystrophy.

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image: Dogs’ Friendly Demeanor Written in Their DNA

Dogs’ Friendly Demeanor Written in Their DNA

By Bob Grant | July 20, 2017

Researchers pinpoint the genes that make pooches so dang affable.

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image: Dogs Have a Single Genetic Origin: Study

Dogs Have a Single Genetic Origin: Study

By Diana Kwon | July 18, 2017

A new genetic analysis contradicts a 2016 study proposing that our canine companions were domesticated from two distinct populations.

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image: Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study

By Kerry Grens | July 17, 2017

An estimate derived from fertility rates concludes that at least 75 percent of our DNA has no critical utility.

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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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