Loading...

Most Recent

image: Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

By Catherine Offord | March 28, 2018

Baby frogs don’t develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults. 

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

By The Scientist Staff | March 27, 2018

By removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.  

0 Comments

image: Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

By Catherine Offord | March 22, 2018

Researchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.

1 Comment

DNA analysis gives clues to how the ancient hominin’s population split and how they interacted with modern humans.

1 Comment

image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

0 Comments

In an unusual evolutionary twist, local stick spiders have come up with an almost identical repertoire of color morphs in multiple locations.

0 Comments

image: EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

EPA’s Scott Pruitt Doesn’t Buy Evolution

By Kerry Grens | March 5, 2018

In audio files from 2005, the future Administrator of the EPA said there’s a lack of “sufficient scientific facts” to back the theory.

10 Comments

Research into the biological basis of gender identity is in its infancy, but clues are beginning to emerge.

6 Comments

image: Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

By Vikramjit Lahiri and Daniel J. Klionsky | March 1, 2018

New details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.

3 Comments

image: Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the Past

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

Researchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Estonia Offers Free Genetic Testing to Residents
  2. Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains
  3. RNA Injection Restores Hearing in Guinea Pigs
  4. Jim Bridenstine Confirmed to Lead NASA