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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.


image: The Benefits of Trepidation

The Benefits of Trepidation

By Abigail Marsh | November 1, 2017

While wiping fear from our brains may seem attractive, the emotion is an essential part of our behavioral repertoire.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By Steve Graff | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: 2017 Life Science Salary Survey

2017 Life Science Salary Survey

By Aggie Mika | November 1, 2017

Industry professionals make more than academic researchers, but for professors, it may not be about the money.


A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 


The artist discusses music as a means to get kids excited about science, and the inspiration he took from astrophysics and polar bears.


image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By Mikhail Tikhonov | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.


image: U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

By Catherine Offord | October 12, 2017

The decision to leave the United Nations’ educational, scientific, and cultural agency was spurred by what American officials say is the organization’s anti-Israel bias and lack of commitment to reform.


image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

By The Scientist Staff | October 12, 2017

Scientists grew organoids that mimic human fetal brains and infected them with the Zika virus to model its neurological effects.


image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By Ashley Yeager | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.


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