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image: Lubchenco on Conservation

Lubchenco on Conservation

By | July 17, 2017

Former NOAA administrator and environmental scientist Jane Lunchenco discusses the importance of science in the face of climate change.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Image of the Day: Save the Frogs

Image of the Day: Save the Frogs

By | June 23, 2017

Small but striking with its eyebrow-like horns, the 6-centimeter smooth horned frog (Proceratophrys boiei) was one of 453 amphibian species in Brazil assessed in a recent conservation study.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.

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image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

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image: Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

Infographic: Immune Irritation in the Gut

By | June 1, 2017

A look at how gluten affects patients with celiac disease

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image: A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

By | May 18, 2017

Stylophora pistillata, a reef coral in the Northern Red Sea, thrived in simulated global-warming conditions.

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