The Scientist

» science communication and evolution

Most Recent

image: Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

Sharks May Have Evolved from Acanthodians

By | March 14, 2017

Analysis of an ancient shark fossil provides the strongest evidence to date that modern sharks derive from a class of 400 million–year-old bony fish.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Welcome to SciComm

Opinion: Welcome to SciComm

By | March 9, 2017

New to science communication? Here’s how to get started.

0 Comments

“Buena vista” hypothesis suggests that changes in the sizes of eyes, rather than a shift from fins to limbs, led fish to transition to land more than 300 million years ago.  

1 Comment

image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Los Angeles

Q&A: Marching for Science in Los Angeles

By | March 3, 2017

A conversation with graduate student Alex Bradley

3 Comments

image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

0 Comments

image: Marching for Science in San Diego

Marching for Science in San Diego

By | February 27, 2017

A conversation with postdoc Robert Cooper, entrepreneur Alex Eyman, and lawyer Melissa Slawson

3 Comments

image: Science Policy: Anxiety and Resolve at AAAS Conference

Science Policy: Anxiety and Resolve at AAAS Conference

By | February 21, 2017

A panel discussion on channeling science into policy served as a forum for debating the role of scientists under the current administration. 

4 Comments

image: Speaking of Science Policy

Speaking of Science Policy

By | February 21, 2017

Notable quotes from the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting

0 Comments

image: Sights (and Signs) of #StandUpForScience

Sights (and Signs) of #StandUpForScience

By | February 19, 2017

Hundreds of people gathered in Boston’s Copley Square today to show support for science.

3 Comments

image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  3. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  4. Insects’ Neural Learning and Memory Center Discovered in Crustaceans