The Scientist

» neurodegeneration

Most Recent

Upping a gene’s expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.

3 Comments

Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

3 Comments

image: Prions Found in Skin of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Patients

Prions Found in Skin of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Patients

By Jef Akst | November 24, 2017

Infectious protein aggregates from the skin of human patients can cause disease in mice.

0 Comments

New techniques for activating or suppressing neural activity by zapping the skull’s surface allow researchers to target smaller and deeper areas of the brain.

0 Comments

image: Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

By Jef Akst | November 13, 2017

Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

1 Comment

image: Equivocal Findings of Alzheimer’s Trial Using Young Blood

Equivocal Findings of Alzheimer’s Trial Using Young Blood

By Catherine Offord | November 6, 2017

A team of Stanford University researchers say that administering young people’s blood plasma to Alzheimer’s patients could improve cognitive function, but the results have been criticized.

0 Comments

image: How Microbes May Influence Our Behavior

How Microbes May Influence Our Behavior

By Amy Lewis | September 1, 2017

Researchers are piecing together the links between the gut microbiome and mental health.

3 Comments

image: Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

By Jill U. Adams | September 1, 2017

The once fringe idea is gaining traction among the scientific community.

7 Comments

Emerging evidence links bacterial or viral infection with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

0 Comments

Neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells fill in for lost dopamine neurons in a primate model of the disease.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  3. Prevalent Form of Childhood Leukemia May Be Preventable
  4. Arizona Moves to Alter Wording About Evolution in Education