The Scientist

» animal behavior and microbiology

Most Recent

image: How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

By | January 17, 2018

Millions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.

0 Comments

Scientists are beginning to unravel the ways in which we develop a healthy relationship with the bugs in our bodies.

2 Comments

The DIY devices collect data and enable light stimulation, chamber agitation, and gas infusion.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: A 3-D–Printed Ethoscope

Infographic: A 3-D–Printed Ethoscope

By | January 1, 2018

The instrument presents a new option for researchers working on large-scale fly behavior studies.

0 Comments

image: What Bat Quarrels Tell Us About Vocal Learning

What Bat Quarrels Tell Us About Vocal Learning

By | January 1, 2018

New research shows humans aren’t that different from our winged cousins.

1 Comment

Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

0 Comments

image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

1 Comment

image: Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

By | December 1, 2017

Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.

0 Comments

image: Kung Fu Shrimp

Kung Fu Shrimp

By | December 1, 2017

Watch a mantis shrimp punch its prey into submission using its specialized hammers.

0 Comments

The whip spider senses the world in weird and wonderful ways.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Secret Eugenics Conference Uncovered at University College London
  2. Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left Sides
  3. How Do Infant Immune Systems Learn to Tolerate Gut Bacteria?
  4. Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods
AAAS