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image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

By | October 12, 2017

Scientists grew organoids that mimic human fetal brains and infected them with the Zika virus to model its neurological effects.

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image: Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

By | October 11, 2017

Loss of the CLOCK protein, which researchers find is decreased in pediatric epilepsy patients, makes mice more prone to seizures during sleep.

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image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

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image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

By | October 2, 2017

In the mantis shrimp brain, scientists uncover mushroom bodies—learning and memory structures typically found in the brains of insects. 

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Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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The 38-year-old synthetic biologist comes from a long line of tinkerers and engineers.

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image: Insect Deploys Anti-Antiaphrodisiac

Insect Deploys Anti-Antiaphrodisiac

By | October 1, 2017

Female plant bugs produce a compound to counter males’ attempts to render the females unattractive to other mates.

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image: Introducing Batman

Introducing Batman

By | October 1, 2017

Daniel Kish, who is blind, uses vocal clicks to navigate the world by echolocation.

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