The Scientist

» animal behavior, neuroscience and culture

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image: Puppy Love

Puppy Love

By | April 17, 2015

Dog owners bond with their four-legged friends via the same hormonal pathways through which human mothers bond with their babies.

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image: Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

Why DBS Works for Parkinson’s?

By | April 14, 2015

Deep-brain stimulation may effectively treat slow movement, tremor, and rigidity in Parkinson’s patients by reducing synchronicity of neural activity in the motor cortex.

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image: Gene Linked to Eating Disorders Tested

Gene Linked to Eating Disorders Tested

By | April 9, 2015

Mice lacking a gene implicated in human anorexia and bulimia weigh less than their littermates and display a variety of behavioral disorders.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Like Breeds With Like

Like Breeds With Like

By | April 6, 2015

Mice pairs with similar anxiety levels produce offspring more quickly than coupled animals with differing personalities, according to a recent study.

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image: A Spider's Eye View

A Spider's Eye View

By | April 1, 2015

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

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