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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

By Abby Olena | December 6, 2017

Three new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By Kerry Grens | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By Lucas Laursen | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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image: Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

Image of the Day: Horseshoe Bat 

By The Scientist Staff | December 4, 2017

Factors such as humidity and temperature can affect how Rhinolophus clivosus use echolocation. 

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Among this year’s winners are a geneticist who revealed how plants respond to shade and a group of physicists who mapped the universe’s background radiation.

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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services propose covering the test with Medicare. 

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By Anna Azvolinsky | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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image: Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

By Ignacio Amigo | December 1, 2017

Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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