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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.


image: CRISPR Trial for Cancer Patients Proposed

CRISPR Trial for Cancer Patients Proposed

By Katarina Zimmer | January 19, 2018

US researchers could become the first outside China to use the gene-editing technique in the clinic. 


The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.


The BMJ inquiry finds that researchers presented only select results from animal experiments when applying for funding and approval for human trials.


The new policy affects academic and nonprofit grants and cooperative agreements exceeding $50,000. 

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image: Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

By Catherine Offord | January 5, 2018

Signaling pathways triggered by the mother’s immune system may cause complications during fetal development.

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image: Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

By Jef Akst | January 3, 2018

A byproduct of alcohol consumption causes mutations in the DNA of mouse blood stem cells, and some of the breaks are not repaired.


image: Contributors


By Jef Akst and Katarina Zimmer | January 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2018 issue of The Scientist.


image: David Julius Probes the Molecular Mechanics of Pain

David Julius Probes the Molecular Mechanics of Pain

By Anna Azvolinsky | January 1, 2018

For nearly 30 years, the UC San Francisco researcher has delved into unexplored corners of the nervous system.


image: Infographic: A Painful Pathway

Infographic: A Painful Pathway

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.


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