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image: Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

By Ashley Yeager | February 9, 2018

The technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.

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Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.

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image: Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

By The Scientist Staff | January 29, 2018

Mitochondria may sustain temperatures more than 10 °C warmer than human cells, say researchers. 

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The findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.

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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By The Scientist Staff | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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image: Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

By Mark R. Hutchinson | January 1, 2018

Immune-like cells in the central nervous system are now recognized as key participants in the creation and maintenance of persistent pain.

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image: Infographic: A Painful Pathway

Infographic: A Painful Pathway

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.

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image: Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

By Mark R. Hutchinson | January 1, 2018

The acute pain that results from injury or disease is very different from chronic pain.

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image: Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

By Catherine Offord | January 1, 2018

The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.

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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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