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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By Kerry Grens | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By Jef Akst | October 24, 2016

Virus’s effect on RNA methylation; identifying brain cells targeted by Zika; virus found in vaginal secretions for two weeks after infection; updated CDC recommendations for Miami

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image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By Ruth Williams | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

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Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

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image: Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

Pet Meds Adapted from Human Therapies

By Jenny Rood | October 1, 2016

Companies focused on developing treatments for dogs, cats, and horses are bringing a diverse array of products to the pet medicine market.

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image: Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

Techniques for Assessing Genomic Copy Number Variations

By Sarah C.P. Williams | October 1, 2016

As the importance of genomic copy number variations for health and disease becomes clearer, researchers are creating new ways to detect these changes in the genome.

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image: Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

By Jef Akst | September 30, 2016

Genetic variants on chromosome 26 appears to play a role in a dog’s tendency to turn to people for help.

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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By Jef Akst | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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