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image: Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

By Ashley P. Taylor | November 1, 2017

Soluble adenylyl cyclase measures and responds to pH changes in coral cells, but whether it can help the animals withstand ocean acidification is not yet known.

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image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.

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image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.

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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By Mary Bates | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By Steve Graff | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By Shawna Williams | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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