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Social insects kill infected individuals for the benefit of the colony—and now a study has shown how they know who’s sick.

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A controversial hypothesis suggests that jellyfish may one day rule the oceans, and Mola mola may tell us if we are approaching a tipping point.

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image: Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

By Ruth Williams | March 29, 2018

A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.  

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image: Image of the Day: New Neurons

Image of the Day: New Neurons

By The Scientist Staff | March 28, 2018

Scientists discover a molecular factor that allows them to follow neurons from birth to maturity.

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image: Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

By Catherine Offord | March 28, 2018

Baby frogs don’t develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults. 

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image: Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

By The Scientist Staff | March 27, 2018

By removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.  

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image: Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

By Catherine Offord | March 22, 2018

Researchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.

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DNA analysis gives clues to how the ancient hominin’s population split and how they interacted with modern humans.

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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

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In an unusual evolutionary twist, local stick spiders have come up with an almost identical repertoire of color morphs in multiple locations.

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