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image: Image of the Day: Pseudomonas Autophagy

Image of the Day: Pseudomonas Autophagy

By The Scientist Staff | March 30, 2018

Researchers identify antibacterial functions of cell death in Arabidopsis when the plant is infected with Pseudomonas.  

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image: John Sulston, Human Genome Project Leader, Dies

John Sulston, Human Genome Project Leader, Dies

By Kerry Grens | March 12, 2018

The biologist earned a Nobel Prize in 2002 for his work on C. elegans.

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image: Image of the Day: Dial M for Murder

Image of the Day: Dial M for Murder

By The Scientist Staff | August 16, 2017

M proteins from Streptococcus bacteria selectively kill mouse macrophages and human macrophage-like cells by prompting cell death.

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image: Dying Light Marks the Spot

Dying Light Marks the Spot

By Catherine Offord | March 29, 2016

Drug-delivering nanoparticles designed to glow when their target cells die can report on the effectiveness of cancer therapies within just a few hours of treatment, a mouse study shows.

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image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By Amanda B. Keener | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

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image: Inner Ear Undertakers

Inner Ear Undertakers

By Kerry Grens | September 1, 2015

Support cells in the inner ear respond differently to two drugs that kill hair cells.

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image: Autophagy Revives Dying Cancer Cells

Autophagy Revives Dying Cancer Cells

By Kerry Grens | April 7, 2014

Self digestion thwarts self destruction.  

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image: New Approach to Killing Cancer

New Approach to Killing Cancer

By Kerry Grens | March 22, 2014

A drug tested in mice causes tumor cells to explode.  

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image: Dying Worms Emit Ethereal Glow

Dying Worms Emit Ethereal Glow

By Ruth Williams | July 24, 2013

A head-to-tail wave of blue fluorescence signals the death of a nematode worm.

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image: Science on Celluloid

Science on Celluloid

By Andrew P. Han | February 28, 2013

Scientist? Filmmaker? Alexis Gambis welcomes both labels.

3 Comments

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