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image: Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

By | November 1, 2017

Soluble adenylyl cyclase measures and responds to pH changes in coral cells, but whether it can help the animals withstand ocean acidification is not yet known.

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image: Image of the Day: Plastic Feast

Image of the Day: Plastic Feast

By | October 30, 2017

New research suggests that plastic might just “taste good” to hard corals.

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The dolphins and their trainers will search for the endangered porpoises and enclose them in a protected pen.

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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image: Opinion: Banning Shark Fin Sales in the U.S. Will Backfire

Opinion: Banning Shark Fin Sales in the U.S. Will Backfire

By | September 27, 2017

A proposal to do so would cause waste, promote less sustainable fisheries, and penalize US fishers who follow best practices.

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image: Biology Labs Hit by Harvey’s Eye Face Long Road to Recovery

Biology Labs Hit by Harvey’s Eye Face Long Road to Recovery

By | September 15, 2017

At the University of Texas’s Marine Science Institute, the hurricane caused more than $100 million in damage, killed hundreds of study animals, and displaced numerous researchers, but its work continues.

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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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image: Labs in Texas Batten Down the Hatches

Labs in Texas Batten Down the Hatches

By and | August 25, 2017

As Hurricane Harvey approaches land, researchers wait to see if their preparations will protect their experiments.

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image: Plastic Munching Plankton

Plastic Munching Plankton

By | August 16, 2017

This giant larvacean can ingest microplastic pollution and poop it down to the sea floor.

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Researchers show that pinkie-size marine organisms can ingest and poop out microplastics, potentially transporting them to the depths.

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