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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By Jef Akst | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

By John R. Thomas Jr. | December 1, 2015

Warning signs that scandal might be brewing in your lab  

5 Comments

image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By Kerry Grens | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

1 Comment

image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By Ruth Williams | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By Ashley P. Taylor | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By Jenny Rood | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

2 Comments

image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By Jef Akst | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Cultural Riches

Cultural Riches

By Anna Azvolinsky | October 1, 2015

Researchers devise new techniques to facilitate growing bacteria collected from the environment.

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