Most Recent

image: Week in Review: April 28–May 2

Week in Review: April 28–May 2

By Tracy Vence | May 2, 2014

Male scientists stress mice out; using SCNT to reprogram adult cells; acetate can reach mouse brain, reduce appetite; WHO sounds “post-antibiotic era” alarm


image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By Sarah C.P. Williams | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies


image: Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

By Kerry Grens | May 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Cell & Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 38


image: Inactive Actin

Inactive Actin

By Anna Azvolinsky | May 1, 2014

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis shuts down during mitosis in eukaryotic cells because all of the required actin is hoarded by the cytoskeleton.


image: Rare Fat Keeps Fly from Freezing

Rare Fat Keeps Fly from Freezing

By Sandhya Sekar | April 30, 2014

Researchers report the first evidence of cryopreservation by an overwintering insect in which stores of an uncommon lipid are critical.


image: Week in Review: April 21–25

Week in Review: April 21–25

By Tracy Vence | April 25, 2014

Evolution of Y chromosome; delivering gene with “bionic ears”; diversity of an important cyanobacterium; charting genome-sequencing progress; blockbuster pharma deals


image: Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

Artificial Blood Is Patient-Ready

By Jef Akst | April 16, 2014

In the midst of news that engineered organs are being implanted into animals and people, researchers announce the creation of artificial blood for transplant.


image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By Jef Akst | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Week in Review: April 7–11

Week in Review: April 7–11

By Tracy Vence | April 11, 2014

Stress and telomere length in children; osmotic channel protein identified; amoeba nibbles, then kills cells; amphetamine and mental disorder risk; news from AACR


image: Key Osmotic Channel Protein Identified

Key Osmotic Channel Protein Identified

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | April 10, 2014

A little-studied protein appears to be a critical part of the perplexing channel that prevents cells from bursting.

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