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image: Hairy Situation for Wolves

Hairy Situation for Wolves

By Molly Sharlach | November 16, 2014

Researchers find high stress hormone levels in the hair of hunted wolves in Northern Canada.


image: Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

Butterfly Eyespots Deflect Predation

By Bob Grant | November 12, 2014

Researchers show that patterned coloration can be an effective means of distracting predators from vital body parts.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By Bob Grant | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.


image: Contributors


By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By Ruth Williams | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.


image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By Yao-Hua Law | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.


image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.


image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By Yao-Hua Law | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.


image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.


image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By Mark A. Genung, Jennifer A. Schweitzer, and Joseph K. Bailey | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.


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