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image: Virtual Reality May Revolutionize Brain Science

Virtual Reality May Revolutionize Brain Science

By Ashley Yeager | February 1, 2018

New technology could open doors for researchers studying animals’ most complex organ.

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image: “Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

“Retired” Mice Find New Life as Top Models for Autism

By Jessica Wright | January 29, 2018

After years of obscurity, strains of mice with mutations in particular genes are thrust to the fore of autism research.

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image: Monkeys Cloned by Dolly-the-Sheep Technology

Monkeys Cloned by Dolly-the-Sheep Technology

By Catherine Offord | January 25, 2018

The approach, which has never before been successfully attempted in primates, could lead to improved animal models for human biology and disease.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Swearing is Good for You</em>

Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for You

By Emma Byrne | January 24, 2018

In chapter 1, “The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,” author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.

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image: EU Advisor Recommends Regulatory Exemption for Gene Editing

EU Advisor Recommends Regulatory Exemption for Gene Editing

By Catherine Offord | January 19, 2018

Crops produced using mutagenic technologies such as CRISPR should generally be exempt from regulatory laws governing GMOs, according to the published opinion.

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image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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In mice and flies, the Arc protein forms capsids and carries genetic information.

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Researchers identify antibodies for two commonly used Cas9 proteins in human blood. Investors take notice.

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image: Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods

Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods

By Catherine Offord | January 9, 2018

The use of underperforming computational tools is a major offender in science’s reproducibility crisis—and there’s growing momentum to avoid it.

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Researchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.

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