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image: CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

By Abby Olena | December 20, 2017

Researchers reduce the severity of hereditary deafness in mice with the delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 protein-RNA complexes that inactivate a mutant gene in their inner ears. 

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image: Introducing Batman

Introducing Batman

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2017

Daniel Kish, who is blind, uses vocal clicks to navigate the world by echolocation.

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image: Teaching Humans to Echolocate

Teaching Humans to Echolocate

By Diana Kwon | October 1, 2017

By investigating the science behind “seeing” with sound, researchers hope to help blind individuals independently navigate the world.

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image: Image of the Day: Ears-in-a-Dish

Image of the Day: Ears-in-a-Dish

By The Scientist Staff | May 2, 2017

Using three-dimensional culture, which allows cells to grow in a ball-shape aggregate, scientists created inner ear organoids containing sensory neurons and hair cells.

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Music sounds very different to cochlear implant users. Researchers are trying to improve the experience.

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image: Katie Kindt's Quest to Understand Hair Cells

Katie Kindt's Quest to Understand Hair Cells

By Karen Zusi | September 1, 2016

Acting Chief, Section on Sensory Cell Development and Function, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Age: 38

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image: Brain Listens During Sleep

Brain Listens During Sleep

By Tanya Lewis | June 15, 2016

People continue to hear and process words during light non-REM sleep, a study shows.

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image: What’s in a Voice?

What’s in a Voice?

By Kerry Grens | May 1, 2016

More than you think (or could make use of)

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image: Year in Review: Hot Topics

Year in Review: Hot Topics

By Jef Akst | December 21, 2015

In 2015, The Scientist dove deep into the latest research on aging, HIV, hearing, and obesity.

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image: New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

New Route to Hearing Loss Mapped

By Kerry Grens | November 5, 2015

Deficiency in a protein called pejvakin makes inner ear cells more vulnerable to sound, unable to brace themselves against oxidative stress stimulated by noise. 

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