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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By Kerry Grens | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

By Jef Akst | February 8, 2017

Hans Rosling of the Karolinska Institute has passed away at age 68.

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By The Scientist Staff | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By The Scientist Staff | February 1, 2017

Intellectual property theft, gun violence, scientific failure, and more

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By Ben Andrew Henry | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By Anna Azvolinsky | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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image: Meet the Three Finalists for WHO Director-General

Meet the Three Finalists for WHO Director-General

By Diana Kwon | January 26, 2017

The World Health Organization announces three final candidates for the agency’s top position. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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