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Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Drugging the Disorderome

Drugging the Disorderome

By | October 1, 2017

Strategies for targeting intrinsically disordered proteins

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image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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Researchers use base-editing to swap out an erroneous nucleotide responsible for a potentially life-threatening blood disorder.

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image: A Single Mutation in Zika Led to Devastating Effects

A Single Mutation in Zika Led to Devastating Effects

By | September 28, 2017

One amino acid change within a viral structural protein makes the difference between mild cases of brain damage and severe microcephaly in mice.

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