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image: Science Cartoonist Doesn’t Draw “Funny Style”

Science Cartoonist Doesn’t Draw “Funny Style”

By Becca Cudmore | January 31, 2014

Sidney Harris communicates science with minimal line work.

1 Comment

image: Review: “Green Porno”

Review: “Green Porno”

By Ajai Raj | January 29, 2014

Isabella Rossellini explores nature’s kinky side in a one-woman show.

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By Jef Akst | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

1 Comment

image: Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

By Ajai Raj | January 16, 2014

A pair of one-act chamber operas takes the audience inside the world of imagined sound. 

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image: European Researchers Urge H5N1 Caution

European Researchers Urge H5N1 Caution

By Bob Grant | January 2, 2014

A group of scientists has called on the European Commission to evaluate the risks and benefits of research that could make deadly viruses more transmissible.

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image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By Jef Akst | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By Alan de Queiroz | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | January 1, 2014

Are Dolphins Really Smart?, Newton's Football, Outsider Scientists, and We Are Our Brains

1 Comment

image: Evolution’s Stowaways

Evolution’s Stowaways

By Alan de Queiroz | January 1, 2014

Terrestrial mammals, carnivorous plants, and even burrowing reptiles have spread around the globe by braving the seven seas. These chance ocean crossings are rewriting the story of Earth’s biogeography.

2 Comments

image: Fantastical Fish, circa 1719

Fantastical Fish, circa 1719

By Abby Olena | January 1, 2014

A collection of colorful drawings compiled by publisher Louis Renard sheds light on eighteenth-century science.

1 Comment

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