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image: Fighting Viruses with RNAi

Fighting Viruses with RNAi

By | October 10, 2013

The long-debated issue of whether mammals can use RNA interference as an antiviral defense mechanism is finally put to rest.

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image: Focus on the Host

Focus on the Host

By | September 18, 2013

A patient response-based gene expression signature can distinguish respiratory infections caused by viruses from those of bacterial or fungal origin.

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image: Portrait of an HIV Conspirator

Portrait of an HIV Conspirator

By | September 12, 2013

The three-dimensional structure of CCR5, a protein which HIV uses to infect humans' cells, could lead to better anti-HIV drugs.

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image: How Many Mammalian Viruses?

How Many Mammalian Viruses?

By | September 3, 2013

A project that identified almost every virus in the Indian flying fox heralds a new age of viral discovery.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

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image: Week in Review: August 26–30

Week in Review: August 26–30

By | August 30, 2013

New model for neurodevelopment; more biotechs going public; how a virus jumped from mammals to birds; statin side effect linked to genetic variant

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image: Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

By | August 27, 2013

The transmission of reticuloendotheliosis viruses from mammals to birds was most likely an unexpected consequence of medical research.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

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