The Scientist

» virology and evolution

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

By | March 4, 2016

Scientists provide a potential biological link between Zika virus infection and microcephaly.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: What Lies Sleeping

What Lies Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Why can science still not define this most basic biological process?

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image: Who Sleeps?

Who Sleeps?

By and | March 1, 2016

Once believed to be unique to birds and mammals, sleep is found across the metazoan kingdom. Some animals, it seems, can’t live without it, though no one knows exactly why.

5 Comments

image: Pig-to-Pig Transmission of Mosquito-Borne Virus

Pig-to-Pig Transmission of Mosquito-Borne Virus

By | February 29, 2016

The Japanese encephalitis virus, which typically moves to new hosts via mosquito vectors, can jump directly between pigs, according to a study.

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