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image: Mass Resignation from <em>Scientific Reports</em>’s Editorial Board

Mass Resignation from Scientific Reports’s Editorial Board

By Catherine Offord | November 7, 2017

Nineteen researchers have stepped down after the journal decided not to retract a paper that they say plagiarized the work of a Johns Hopkins biomedical scientist.


image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By The Scientist Staff | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 


image: Professor Sues <em>PNAS</em> Over Paper Criticisms

Professor Sues PNAS Over Paper Criticisms

By Kerry Grens | November 2, 2017

Stanford’s Mark Jacobson is asking for $10 million in damages after the journal published a critique of his work on renewable energy.


image: Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

By Ashley P. Taylor | November 1, 2017

Soluble adenylyl cyclase measures and responds to pH changes in coral cells, but whether it can help the animals withstand ocean acidification is not yet known.


image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.


image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.


image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.


The group calls for the retraction of six publications by surgeon Paolo Macchiarini regarding the synthetic trachea transplantations that led to the death of at least three patients. 


Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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image: <em>Oncotarget</em> Journal Cut from Medline

Oncotarget Journal Cut from Medline

By Katarina Zimmer | October 26, 2017

New papers from a cancer journal once named as a possibly predatory publication will no longer appear in the widely used research database.


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