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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By Philip Jaekl | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.


image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.


The group calls for the retraction of six publications by surgeon Paolo Macchiarini regarding the synthetic trachea transplantations that led to the death of at least three patients. 


Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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image: <em>Oncotarget</em> Journal Cut from Medline

Oncotarget Journal Cut from Medline

By Katarina Zimmer | October 26, 2017

New papers from a cancer journal once named as a possibly predatory publication will no longer appear in the widely used research database.


With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

By Ashley P. Taylor | October 23, 2017

Researchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.


A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 


image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By Catherine Offord | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles.

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