The Scientist

» retraction and cell & molecular biology

Most Recent

A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

0 Comments

image: Karolinska Finds Macchiarini Guilty of Misconduct

Karolinska Finds Macchiarini Guilty of Misconduct

By | December 22, 2016

The embattled thoracic surgeon is dealt another blow by his former employer, which is calling for the retraction of one of his papers on artificial esophagus research.

0 Comments

image: Top 10 Retractions of 2016

Top 10 Retractions of 2016

By | December 21, 2016

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

2 Comments

image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

1 Comment

image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

0 Comments

Scientists present evidence of bacteria-driven mating in flagellate eukaryotes at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.

0 Comments

image: Controlled Splicing Extends Life Span in Roundworms

Controlled Splicing Extends Life Span in Roundworms

By | December 7, 2016

Increasing the expression of an RNA splicing factor mimics dietary restriction, prolonging life in nematodes. 

0 Comments

image: “Celldance” Selections

“Celldance” Selections

By | December 5, 2016

Highlights from the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2016 video grant competition

0 Comments

image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

0 Comments

image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. 2017 Top 10 Innovations
    Features 2017 Top 10 Innovations

    From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

  3. Search for Life on the Red Planet
  4. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
FreeShip