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image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

1 Comment

image: Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

Three Retractions for Highly Cited Author

By | March 19, 2015

Robert Weinberg’s team at MIT is pulling three papers, noting some figure panels were composites of different experiments.

4 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Author Sues Journal

Author Sues Journal

By | February 10, 2015

The American Diabetes Association faces a lawsuit after journal editors express concern over several papers.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Debunking Junk

Opinion: Debunking Junk

By | February 9, 2015

With more and more bad science infiltrating the media landscape, it’s time for researchers to speak up.

10 Comments

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

0 Comments

image: Journalists to Catalog Retractions

Journalists to Catalog Retractions

By | December 16, 2014

Staff of the blog Retraction Watch will create a database of papers retracted from the scientific literature.

1 Comment

image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

2 Comments

image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

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