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Summit Science

By | June 20, 2011

Researchers seeking a link between vision problems and the dangerous physiological effects of hypoxia in mountain climbers are taking their work to new heights.

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Head trauma in the funny pages

By | June 17, 2011

Researchers are using real-world methods to study traumatic brain injuries in a comic book.

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Keeping immunity in check

By | June 16, 2011

Two newly discovered proteins that act as brakes to slow a plant's immune response after infection may provide clues to autoimmune treatments.

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image: Stress births neural stem cells

Stress births neural stem cells

By | June 15, 2011

When mice are held in isolation, stem cells in the hippocampus make more of themselves and wait for better times.

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2011 World Science Festival: A look back

By | June 10, 2011

The Scientist covered some of the events that made this year's festival memorable.

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Top 7 in vaccination

By | June 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in vaccination and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

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Approaching Universality

By | June 5, 2011

Pitfalls and triumphs on the way to complete vaccine protection.

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image: The rhythm of biology

The rhythm of biology

By | June 3, 2011

An art exhibit in New York City explores the science behind our reaction to sounds and sensations.

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image: The Anatomy of a High

The Anatomy of a High

By | June 3, 2011

When someone snorts or smokes cocaine, which is composed of small crystalline alkaloid molecules, the drug enters the bloodstream and from there eventually crosses into the heart, brain, and other organs. 

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image: Part Human, Part HIV

Part Human, Part HIV

By | June 3, 2011

Like other enveloped viruses, HIV exits its host cell enshrouded in the cell’s membrane, which contains membrane molecules such as the human leukocyte antigens (HLA). 

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