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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

Cataloging Fungal Life in Antarctic Seas

By | December 1, 2017

Brazilian researchers report a relatively large diversity of fungi in marine ecosystems surrounding Antarctica, but warn that climate change could bring unpleasant surprises.

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The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researcher’s work will help predict how the Arctic is responding to climate change—and the global effects of those changes.

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image: Infographic: The Hazards of Life on Mars

Infographic: The Hazards of Life on Mars

By | December 1, 2017

High levels of radiation, among other health risks, challenge the future colonation of the Red Planet.

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image: Search for Life on the Red Planet

Search for Life on the Red Planet

By | December 1, 2017

Growing evidence points to a once-habitable world—and recent findings suggest that life could exist on Mars today.

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image: Flies’ Feet Can Spread Bacteria

Flies’ Feet Can Spread Bacteria

By | November 27, 2017

Lab experiments and metagenomic analyses of flies’ resident bacteria indicate that the insects carry microbes from place to place on their legs.

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The former chief of Eli Lilly USA is picked to replace Tom Price, who stepped down in September amid a controversy over the abuse of taxpayer-funded travel.

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image: Republican Tax Plan Eliminates Popular Education Exemptions

Republican Tax Plan Eliminates Popular Education Exemptions

By | November 6, 2017

The proposal draws criticism from higher-education groups.

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President Donald Trump’s pick to serve as the US Department of Agriculture’s undersecretary for research, education, and economics blames the “political climate” for his decision. 

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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