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The former chief of Eli Lilly USA is picked to replace Tom Price, who stepped down in September amid a controversy over the abuse of taxpayer-funded travel.

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image: Republican Tax Plan Eliminates Popular Education Exemptions

Republican Tax Plan Eliminates Popular Education Exemptions

By | November 6, 2017

The proposal draws criticism from higher-education groups.

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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President Donald Trump’s pick to serve as the US Department of Agriculture’s undersecretary for research, education, and economics blames the “political climate” for his decision. 

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image: U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

By | October 12, 2017

The decision to leave the United Nations’ educational, scientific, and cultural agency was spurred by what American officials say is the organization’s anti-Israel bias and lack of commitment to reform.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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Heads of CMS, FDA are among the potential replacements.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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