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image: Opinion: Share Your Data

Opinion: Share Your Data

By Michael P. Milham, Arno Klein, and Cameron Craddock | October 24, 2017

Our analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.


image: Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

By Ashley P. Taylor | October 23, 2017

Researchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.


image: Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

Symmetrical Eyes Indicate Dyslexia

By Ruth Williams | October 18, 2017

People who read normally tend to have one dominant eye while people with dyslexia do not, research shows.


image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By Catherine Offord | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles.

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Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna would be the first approved therapy in the U.S. that replaces or repairs a defective gene inherited from one’s parents.


image: U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

By Catherine Offord | October 12, 2017

The decision to leave the United Nations’ educational, scientific, and cultural agency was spurred by what American officials say is the organization’s anti-Israel bias and lack of commitment to reform.


image: Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

Circadian Gene Linked to Severe Epilepsy in Children

By Diana Kwon | October 11, 2017

Loss of the CLOCK protein, which researchers find is decreased in pediatric epilepsy patients, makes mice more prone to seizures during sleep.


Combined transcription and genome data from multiple tissues in hundreds of human donors reveal links between genotype and gene expression across the body.

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Tissue recipients were treated as “guinea pigs,” says investigation leader.


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