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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Reactions to the March for Science

Reactions to the March for Science

By | April 25, 2017

The Scientist’s Bob Grant caught up with demonstrators who participated in the March for Science in Washington, DC, on April 22.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Politics of Cancer</em>

Book Excerpt from The Politics of Cancer

By | April 1, 2017

In Chapter 2, “Identifying the Culprits,” author Wendy Whitman Cobb describes how small-government, anti-regulation conservatism can hinder the fight against cancer.

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image: Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

By | April 1, 2017

Using biocompatible polymers to carry cancer immune therapies directly to the tumor

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image: How Will Cancer Research Fare Under Trump?

How Will Cancer Research Fare Under Trump?

By | April 1, 2017

The new administration has not yet made its intentions clear.

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image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

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image: Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

By | April 1, 2017

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

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