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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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National opinions about the effectiveness of last month’s science and climate marches are mixed and follow political lines, a Pew survey reports.

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New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.

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The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

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image: Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

Macron’s Election Win Cheered by Scientists

By | May 8, 2017

The future French president’s goals are pro-science, yet he will need parliamentary support.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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