The Scientist

» cancer, neuroscience, culture and evolution

Most Recent

image: Infographic: Cancer Drug Pairings

Infographic: Cancer Drug Pairings

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 1, 2018

Researchers use several different strategies to deliver a one-two punch.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Capturing Exosomes From Fluids

Infographic: Capturing Exosomes From Fluids

By Ruth Williams | April 1, 2018

A microfluidic device collects microRNAs for analysis.

0 Comments

Errors in segregation during cell division can lead to inflammation in daughter cells.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Structure of the Perineuronal Net

Infographic: Structure of the Perineuronal Net

By Daniela Carulli | April 1, 2018

See the web of proteins that make up these neuronal wrappings.

0 Comments

image: Macrophages Play a Double Role in Cancer

Macrophages Play a Double Role in Cancer

By Amanda B. Keener | April 1, 2018

Macrophages play numerous roles within tumors, leaving cancer researchers with a choice: eliminate the cells or recruit them.

0 Comments

The neuronal coverings that mediate synaptic changes are involved in everything from memory to psychiatric disorders, affecting autism, Alzheimer’s, and addiction.

0 Comments

Multidrug combinations lead to better results for cancer patients, but efficiently identifying them is proving difficult.

0 Comments

image: Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

By Ruth Williams | March 29, 2018

A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.  

1 Comment

image: Is the Interstitium Really a New Organ?

Is the Interstitium Really a New Organ?

By Abby Olena | March 28, 2018

A study confirms that the spaces between cells are fluid-filled, rather than tightly packed with connective tissue, but pathologists say the findings’ implications remain to be seen.

3 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

By The Scientist Staff | March 27, 2018

By removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.  

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. RNA Moves a Memory From One Snail to Another
  3. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  4. Sweden Cancels Agreement With Elsevier Over Open Access