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image: The Cancer Genes Needed for Immunotherapy Response

The Cancer Genes Needed for Immunotherapy Response

By | August 7, 2017

Using a large CRISPR-based screen, researchers find possible genetic culprits for patients not having success with immune checkpoint inhibitors.  

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Fascinated by Folding

Fascinated by Folding

By | August 4, 2017

Lila Gierasch uses biochemical tools to understand how linear chains of amino acids turn into complex three-dimensional structures.

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image: Peer-Review Fraud Scheme Uncovered in China

Peer-Review Fraud Scheme Uncovered in China

By | July 31, 2017

The Chinese government finds almost 500 researchers guilty of misconduct in relation to a recent spate of retractions from a cancer journal.

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Mouse organoids reveal that a protein active during embryonic development joins forces with gene enhancers to revert cancer cells to an earlier developmental state.

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Two freely available databases include data on hundreds of human cancer cell lines. 

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image: Stem Cells Seek Out Tumors Based on Stiffness

Stem Cells Seek Out Tumors Based on Stiffness

By | July 26, 2017

The technique, demonstrated in mice using engineered mesenchymal stem cells, has potential for both diagnosis and treatment.

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A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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