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image: Making Cancer More Transparent

Making Cancer More Transparent

By | April 1, 2013

A decade into the age of genomics, science is generating a flood of data that will help in the quest to eradicate the disease.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Up, Up, and Array

Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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image: Models of Transparency

Models of Transparency

By , , , and | April 1, 2013

Researchers are taking advantage of small, transparent zebrafish embryos and larvae—and a special strain of see-through adults—to understand the development and spread of cancer.

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image: Cancer Gene Bonanza

Cancer Gene Bonanza

By | March 27, 2013

International collaboration doubles the number of genetic regions associated with breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers.

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image: Atoms and Arias

Atoms and Arias

By | March 22, 2013

A Portuguese professor explores the poisons and potions of opera.

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Snobby Scientists

By | March 21, 2013

Does the preference of many scientists to only hear talks from successful institutions limit the reach of innovation?

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image: La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

By | March 15, 2013

The sculptures of Mara G. Haseltine's new exhibition tell a tale of beautiful oceans ravaged by pollution.

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image: Love Song for an Ailing Planet

Love Song for an Ailing Planet

By | March 15, 2013

Artist Mara G. Haseltine unveils her latest exhibition of science-inspired sculpture, a melancholy ode to marine plankton set to the music of Puccini.

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