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Skeleton Keys

By | May 14, 2011

There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical.

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image: Tylenol tied to blood cancer

Tylenol tied to blood cancer

By | May 14, 2011

Chronic users of acetaminophen (Tylenol) have a higher risk of developing blood cancer, according to a study published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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image: Gays have higher cancer risk?

Gays have higher cancer risk?

By | May 14, 2011

Gay men are nearly twice as likely to report that they've had cancer as heterosexual men, according to a US health survey published in Cancer.

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image: Billion dollar babies of the human genome

Billion dollar babies of the human genome

By | May 14, 2011

The Human Genome Project has generated nearly $800 billion in economic output and hundreds of thousands of jobs in genomics and related industries.

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image: How heat helps kill cancer

How heat helps kill cancer

By | May 9, 2011

Local hyperthermia boosts the effectiveness of cancer treatments by preventing DNA repair in tumor cells.

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image: Best Places to Work Industry, 2011

Best Places to Work Industry, 2011

By | May 1, 2011

By forging new relationships and finding novel uses for existing technologies, this year’s top companies are employing creative ways to advance their science.

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image: Opinion: The decline of physiology

Opinion: The decline of physiology

By | April 19, 2011

Medical schools in the UK are teaching physiology courses primarily focused on clinical applications with much curtailed practical laboratory training to the detriment of medical education

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image: Imagining a Cure

Imagining a Cure

By | April 11, 2011

For cancer patients, close is not good enough.

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image: Taking Aim at Melanoma

Taking Aim at Melanoma

By | April 1, 2011

Understanding oncogenesis at the molecular level offers the prospect of tailoring treatments much more precisely for patients with advanced cases of this deadliest of skin cancers.

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image: Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

By | April 1, 2011

Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, including a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, that interweaved practical medical knowledge with Buddhist traditions and local lore.

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