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image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

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image: Feeding Time

Feeding Time

By | February 1, 2013

The eating schedule—and not the amount of calories—can make the difference between an obese, diabetic, sick mouse and one with a healthy metabolism.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

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image: Photonic Colored Creatures

Photonic Colored Creatures

By | February 1, 2013

Animals and plants come in a dizzying array of colors. Current research is cracking into the remarkable structures behind nature's artistic display.

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image: Stockpiling Histones

Stockpiling Histones

By | February 1, 2013

Histones stored on lipid droplets in fly embryos provide a backup supply when newly synthesized ones are lacking.

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image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

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image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

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