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image: It Takes Two

It Takes Two

By | November 21, 2013

Two genes from the Y chromosome are sufficient to generate male mice capable of fathering healthy offspring via an assisted reproductive technique.

1 Comment

image: Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

By | November 21, 2013

Chytrid fungus has likely driven the decline of two South American frog species named for Charles Darwin.

0 Comments

image: Temperature-Dependent Immunity

Temperature-Dependent Immunity

By | November 18, 2013

Scientists show that mice housed at room temperature are less able to fight tumors.

8 Comments

image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.

20 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 11–15

Week in Review: November 11–15

By | November 15, 2013

Combating bacterial persistence; ancient canine evolution; T cells and transplants; sharing omics data and code

0 Comments

image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.

7 Comments

image: Felid Fossils

Felid Fossils

By | November 13, 2013

Paleontologists discover the oldest evidence yet suggesting that big cats originated in Asia.

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image: Retracing Steps

Retracing Steps

By | November 11, 2013

Sage Bionetworks aims to show that transparency and sharing are key to ensuring research reproducibility.

1 Comment

image: Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

Next Generation: Cancer Drug in Disguise

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers develop a strategy for rendering a toxic drug harmless—until it encounters a pair of enzymes that signals cancer cells are nearby.

2 Comments

image: Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

By | November 3, 2013

Common mutations in metastasized breast tumors suggest how the cancer can develop resistance to frontline drugs.

2 Comments

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