The Scientist

» cancer, ecology and genetics & genomics

Most Recent

image: Omics

Omics

By Stephen Friend and Megan Scudellari | October 1, 2011

Early sequencing evolved into the publication of genomes for myriad species, including our own, within the span of two and a half decades. Bioinformatician Stephen Friend opines on what's in store as the next quarter century of omics takes shape.

0 Comments

image: <em>The Scientist,</em> Inaugural Issue, 1986

The Scientist, Inaugural Issue, 1986

By Jef Akst | October 1, 2011

Twenty-five years later, the magazine is still hitting many of the same key discussion points of science.

0 Comments

image: A Small Revolution

A Small Revolution

By Erica Westly | October 1, 2011

In fewer than 15 years, nanomedicine has gone from fantasy to reality.

0 Comments

image: Charting the Course

Charting the Course

By Jeffrey M. Perkel | October 1, 2011

Three gene jockeys share their thoughts on past and future tools of the trade.

6 Comments

image: Double Blind

Double Blind

By Cristina Luiggi | October 1, 2011

The mother of disabled twins doggedly pursued the root of her children's illness and found it in their genome profiles.

6 Comments

image: Early Warning Signs

Early Warning Signs

By Richard P. Grant | October 1, 2011

Editor’s choice in Ecology

3 Comments

image: Evolution, Tout de Suite

Evolution, Tout de Suite

By Richard P. Grant | October 1, 2011

Epigenetic perturbations could jump-start heritable variation.

9 Comments

image: Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine

October 1, 2011

At the nanoscale old materials acquire new properties that International Institute for Nanotechnology Director Chad Mirkin thinks will change the way medicine is practiced.

0 Comments

image: Newly Discovered Species

Newly Discovered Species

By N/A | October 1, 2011

Life on Earth is mind-bogglingly diverse with estimates of the number of existing species in the tens of millions. Over the last 4 billion years, many species have gone extinct; and because of the actions of humans, many existing species are now endangered.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Evolving Engineering

Opinion: Evolving Engineering

By George M. Church | October 1, 2011

Exploiting the unique properties of living systems makes synthetic biologists better engineers.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Prominent Salk Institute Scientist Inder Verma Resigns
  2. Anheuser-Busch Won’t Fund Controversial NIH Alcohol Study
  3. North American Universities Increasingly Cancel Publisher Packages
  4. “Public” T-Cell Receptors From Resistant People Fend Off HIV