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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: <em>Oncotarget</em> Journal Cut from Medline

Oncotarget Journal Cut from Medline

By | October 26, 2017

New papers from a cancer journal once named as a possibly predatory publication will no longer appear in the widely used research database.

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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image: Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Identified

By | October 23, 2017

Researchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.

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image: Image of the Day: Sun Burn

Image of the Day: Sun Burn

By | October 20, 2017

When certain melanocyte stem cells are exposed to UV rays, a molecular cascade can trigger melanoma, scientists find in mice.

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image: FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

FDA Approves Second CAR T-Cell Therapy

By | October 19, 2017

The therapy, produced by Kite Pharma and owned by Gilead Sciences, is approved for use against some types of large B-cell lymphomas. 

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune Signals

By | October 16, 2017

In mice, the tumor cells are able to thwart the immune response that would kill them—but immunotherapy prevented the return of melanoma.

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