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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

3 Comments

image: Herding Cats

Herding Cats

By | December 17, 2013

Examination of bones found in a Chinese village suggests that domesticated felines lived side-by-side with humans 5,300 years ago.

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image: Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

By | December 16, 2013

Mouse colon cancer cells can fuse with macrophages, leading to changes in tumor growth.

5 Comments

image: Test Scores Are in the Genes

Test Scores Are in the Genes

By | December 16, 2013

More than school or family environment, a child’s genetics influences high school exam results.

7 Comments

image: How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

By | December 12, 2013

Escherichia coli can quickly evolve to resist engulfment by macrophages, scientists have found.

4 Comments

image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

4 Comments

image: Gender-based Citation Disparities

Gender-based Citation Disparities

By | December 12, 2013

An analysis reveals that papers with women as key authors are cited less often than those with men as key authors.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

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image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

0 Comments

image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

1 Comment

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