The Scientist

» cancer and evolution

Most Recent

image: Infographic: Cancer Drug Pairings

Infographic: Cancer Drug Pairings

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 1, 2018

Researchers use several different strategies to deliver a one-two punch.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Capturing Exosomes From Fluids

Infographic: Capturing Exosomes From Fluids

By Ruth Williams | April 1, 2018

A microfluidic device collects microRNAs for analysis.

0 Comments

Errors in segregation during cell division can lead to inflammation in daughter cells.

0 Comments

image: Macrophages Play a Double Role in Cancer

Macrophages Play a Double Role in Cancer

By Amanda B. Keener | April 1, 2018

Macrophages play numerous roles within tumors, leaving cancer researchers with a choice: eliminate the cells or recruit them.

0 Comments

Multidrug combinations lead to better results for cancer patients, but efficiently identifying them is proving difficult.

0 Comments

image: Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

By Ruth Williams | March 29, 2018

A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.  

1 Comment

image: Is the Interstitium Really a New Organ?

Is the Interstitium Really a New Organ?

By Abby Olena | March 28, 2018

A study confirms that the spaces between cells are fluid-filled, rather than tightly packed with connective tissue, but pathologists say the findings’ implications remain to be seen.

3 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

By The Scientist Staff | March 27, 2018

By removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.  

0 Comments

DNA analysis gives clues to how the ancient hominin’s population split and how they interacted with modern humans.

1 Comment

image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Prominent Salk Institute Scientist Inder Verma Resigns
  2. Anheuser-Busch Won’t Fund Controversial NIH Alcohol Study
  3. Dartmouth Professor Investigated for Sexual Misconduct Retires
  4. North American Universities Increasingly Cancel Publisher Packages